About the Post

Author Information

Tania is currently the Founder & Editor-in-Chief of The Hudsucker, and a News Editor at the Nashville, Tennessee based PopCulture.com. With past writing and editing credits with Womanista, Quietly, the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF) and NBC Newsvine, she is currently a member of Indianapolis based, Society of Professional Journalists — one of the oldest organizations in the U.S. that promotes and represents journalists. She is an avid Indianapolis Colts, Elvis Presley and baseball fan as well as a lover of pancakes and fine cheeses, film, and music. Tania is a Hoosier at heart with a passionate wanderlust for always traveling and giving back to those in her community. She is currently a journalism student at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. Follow Tania on Twitter: @westlifebunny.

Is Pizza a Healthier Breakfast Option Than Cereal?

istock-pizza

{Image Credit: iStock}

Whether it’s microwaved or store-bought, pizza is the epitome of the perfect food. While its combination of cheese and carb goodness is ideal for get-togethers, breakups, study sessions or even late nights, studies now suggest it might also be healthier than most breakfast cereals.

The Daily Meal reports that if you’re considering a slice of pizza for breakfast, you might be on to something.

To the naked eye, pizza is always the superior choice thanks to its protein, carbs, veggies and calcium. But according to researchers, it’s a lot more balanced.

Registered dietitian, Chelsey Amer told the Daily Meal that the average slice of pizza and a bowl of cereal with whole milk actually contain the same amount of calories, however pizza adds a “much larger” protein punch.

“This will keep you full and boost satiety throughout the morning,” Amer said, adding that it should be noted pizza isn’t a health food per se. Especially as it’s not exactly your most nutritious option compared to that bowl of sugar.

As a more “balanced meal,” Amer confirms it’s a better choice among the two.

“Plus, a slice of pizza contains more fat and much less sugar than most cold cereals, so you will not experience a quick sugar crash,” she said.

While some might continue their cereal trend, it’s a known fact that America’s cereal options are nutritionally bleak when it comes to protein, healthy fats and nourishment.

For years, cereal giants like Kellogg’s have been accused over sugar, salt and fat content. A study from Reuters in 2014 found that U.S. children are consuming more than 10 pounds (4.5 kgs) of sugar annually if they eat a typical morning bowl of cereal each day, which contributes to obesity and other health problems.

A Washington-based health non-profit known as the Environmental Working Group, studied more than 1,500 cereals, including 181 marketed to children. In the report, they re-examined 84 cereals it initially studied in a similar report from 2011, and found the sugar content of those cereals remained on average at 29 percent.

The report goes on to state that some cereals had even increased sugar content. On average, it was discovered that children’s cereals have more than 40 percent more sugars than adult cereals. The research concluded that one of the worst offenders was Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, with 56 percent sugar by weight.

But while pizza might seem like the easier, cooler option, Amer does highlight that pizza is not the next kale, arugula or quinoa. Pizza is definitely the easier option for a grab-and-go kind of morning, but it is still high in calories, saturated fat and sodium, and should be eaten in moderation as excessive consumption could lead to heart disease, high cholesterol and blood pressure, according to CNN.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave A Reply [Invalid Emails Will Be Marked As Spam]

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: